Welcome to UCSC's Genome Technology Center

The ability to dynamically measure gene and protein expression as well as signaling at the single cell level is key to understanding single cell behavior in a complex environment. Tissue architecture and function rely on cell-cell physical interactions and chemical crosstalk. Individual cells, acting in concert, control normal physiology as well as pathological states in disease processes. There is now a strong body of evidence for cancer initiation and progression being driven at a large extent by structural and signaling alterations in various cell types that make up the tissue. Therefore, there is an important need for a technology that interrogates tissues at the single cell level. Pourmand's team's focus is to understand how single cell heterogeneity contributes to two pivotal processes in malignancy. Pourmand;s team developing assays and tools to reliably amplify RNA and DNA from a siingle cell for further analysis.

In addition, at the UCSC Genome Technology Center Pourmand's team uses high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics to understand genetic variation and its function in health, disease, and biological systems. The UCSC Genome Technology Center is an initiative of Dr. Nader Pourmand, aimed at supporting the UCSC and QB3 scientific communities in generating data and resources for basic and applied biomedical research. We intend to provide state-of-the-art genomic technology to all research groups who wish to use it. The center currently houses Roche's 454 titanium-sequencing instrument, Applied Biosystem's SOLiD4 sequencer and, Illumina's HiSeq 2000. In addition to these NGS platforms the Center is now home to a NanoString instrument (please click here to see the potential applications of this exciting new technology). The research of the center focuses on generating both high-quality data for the scientific community and improving next generation platform technology.

The UCSC Genome Technology Center is primarily funded by the California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3) and the Science, Technology, Engineering, Policy, and Society (STEPS) Institute.